The flight attendants “felt that the innocent animal was better off crammed inside the overhead container without air and water,” Lara wrote on Facebook. “They INSISTED that the puppy be locked up for three hours without any kind of airflow. They assured the safety of the family’s pet so wearily, the mother agreed.”

A grieving family is speaking out after, they say, a United Airlines flight attendant forced them to put their beloved family pet in an overhead bin, where he died in flight. The 10-month-old French bulldog was kept there for the entire three-and-a-half hour trip from Houston to New York on Monday.

Here’s the story from Fox News:

Tragedy struck on a United Airlines flight 1284 from Houston to New York City, when a dog in a TSA-compliant pet carrier died after a flight attendant allegedly forced its owner to store the animal and its carrier in an overhead bin for the duration of the four-hour Monday flight.

United has since claimed full responsibility for the “tragic accident” that killed Kokito, a black French bulldog, owned by Catalina Robledo of New York, who was traveling with her two children, ABC 13 reports. Robledo says that the airline has since contacted asking to settle the situation with money, which she says the situation is not about.

Here’s more from CBS:

The 10-month-old French bulldog was kept there for the entire three-and-a-half hour trip from Houston to New York Monday. The airline has apologized.

United Airlines issued a statement accepting full responsibility for the incident, which it says is under investigation. Still, many are wondering how an experienced flight attendant could let this happen, reports CBS News’ Kris Van Cleave.

“He was a really special dog. It’s just sad the way he has to, just leave,” said 11-year-old Sophia Ceballos. For Sophia and her mother, Catalina Robledo, Kokito was part of the family.

United Continental apologized for the dog’s death in a statement on Tuesday.

They called it a “tragic accident that should never have occurred, as pets should never be placed in the overhead bin.”

How much financial compensation would you award the family?