Pet Food Giant Claims ‘There’s No Dogs in Our Dog Food,’ But Experts Disagree…

“Somehow these dog carcasses are getting into the dog food. The only logical conclusion is that it’s coming from dogs euthanized using pentobarbital,” Dr. Nicholas Dodman, former director of Tufts University’s Animal Behavior program, told WJLA.

The J.M. Smucker company is finally admitting what’s in their their flagship dog food brands Gravy Train, Kibbles ‘N Bits, Skippy and Ol’ Roy. The pet food giant has finally confirmed that small amounts of the euthanasia drug pentobarbital has been found in their products. However, they deny that the presence of the drug comes from using euthanized dogs as an ingredient.

Unfortunately for the J.M. Smucker company, experts don’t believe that lie for a second, and neither do we!

Check this out from Dog Food Advisor:

The pet food industry has denied the rumors for years. Yet the reports just keep coming. They claim a number of companies continue to use euthanized pets to make dog food.

And we’re still unable to locate any current regulation forbidding the use of euthanized pets in commercial dog food.

To avoid choosing a dog food that might contain dead cats and dogs, there’s only one way to minimize the risk…

Never buy any product made with an anonymous animal ingredient

By anonymous, we’re referring to meat-based ingredients that do not specify the source animal. They use vague terms like “meat meal” rather than more specific words like “chicken meal” to describe their components.

According to the pet food industry, meat can come from virtually any mammal.

So, generic meat meal can be legally made from road kill, dead, diseased or dying farm animals — even euthanized cats and dogs.

Here’s more from our friends at the Miami Herald:

There’s no dog in our dog food, says the J.M. Smucker company, but it admitted that some canned Gravy Train and Kibbles ‘N Bits varieties contained a sedative used to put dogs down.

As Smucker informs the public via its brand websites, “We have confirmed extremely low levels of pentobarbital in select shipments” of Gravy Train, Kibbles ‘N Bits, Skippy and Ol’ Roy canned wet dog food, the company also says it has the answer to how the drug got into the food.

Testing at an outside lab, Smucker said, indicates that animal fat was the source of the pentobarbital.

“Lab results from tests of the ingredient in which pentobarbital was found confirmed the animal fat was sourced from cow, chicken, and pig, which are common sources in pet food,” a Smucker spokesperson said Sunday morning in an e-mail to the Miami Herald. 

In the wake of testing by Washington, D.C. station WJLA that revealed the pentobarbital in Gravy Train, various entities posed the possibility that it could have gotten into the food from dogs who had been put down.

“Somehow these dog carcasses are getting into the dog food. The only logical conclusion is that it’s coming from dogs euthanized using pentobarbital,” Dr. Nicholas Dodman, former director of Tufts University’s Animal Behavior program, told WJLA.

While we understand that accidents happen and any industrial process, by definition, will have its fair share of mistakes, this is simply inexcusable!

There is no way that I will ever buy any pet food products from J.M. Smucker.

The idea that the pentobarbital was introduced into the supply chain via animals that had been killed using it is unacceptable.

Do you want to know the truth?

Does your pet eat Kibbles ‘N Bits or Gravy Train?